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Tidkinhow

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A guide to the history of Tidkinhow

 

 

 

  

Home Page

The Farndale Directory

Farndale Themes

Farndale History

Particular branches of the family tree

Other Information

General Sir Martin Farndale KCB

Links

 

Introduction

 

Dates are in red.

Hyperlinks to other pages are in dark blue.

Headlines of the history of Three Hills are in brown.

References and citations are in turquoise.

Contextual history is in purple.

 

The Farndales of Tidkinhow

 

First, please visit the Farndales of Tidkinhow page.

 

Then please go to the Tidkinhow Line and then to the page of Martin Farndale (FAR00364).

 

 

The History of Tidkinhow

 

Tidkinhow Farm is located 4 miles southeast of Guisborough in the County of Cleveland. It consists of a few acres of grassland and large tracts of Guisborough moor.

The name Tidkinhow is probably derived from an old Saxon word describing ownership of the hill upon which the house now stands. How meant hill or mound and it probably belonged to a man called Tydi and his kin. So it meant, literally, "Tydi's How".

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Prehistoric

There are prehistoric remains on the moors edge at Tidkinhow. There is a stone alignment of probable Bronze Age date at Grid NZ645127, incorporated in a cross ridge dyke of Bronze Age or Iron Age date. The monument extends from Tidkinhow Slack on the north side of the ridge to North Ings on the south. From the north the first 275m is only visible as a slight outer scarp on the west with a ditch almost completely infilled. The next 410m section is the best preserved with a bank 5m wide and 1.2m high and a line of standing stones on its east side and a ditch 3m wide and 1m deep on its west side. The stones are about 1m high, 0.5m long and 0.3m thick. For the last 85m the rampart and ditch have completely disappeared with only a few standing stones marking its course. Most of the elements were mapped from air photographs as part of the North York Moors NMP, and are extant on the latest 2009 vertical photography. The middle and southern sections to North Ing Slack are scheduled.

 

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Tidkinhow Stack                                                                  Hob Cross at Tidkinhow Head

 

28 May 1422

At Westminster. Order given to William Nevyll and Joan his wife, seisin of the castles, manors, lands, saltworks, knights fees etc, herein after mentioned….(long list of places)….and a close called Tydkinhowe.’ (Patent Rolls). See FAR00055.

Historical monuments

There is a boundary stone at NZ646133, which is listed.

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1836

The Times, 3 September 1836: To be peremptory sold, pursuant to the orders of the High Court of Chancery, made in a cause Harker v Brigham, with the approbation of William Braham Esquire, one of the masters of the said court, at the Buck Inn, Guisborough, in the county of York, on Tuesday the 27th day of September 1836, at 3 o’clock in the afternoon, in one lot, a FREEHOLD ESTATE consisting of two farmhouses, and requisite outbuildings, and 272 acres 2r 3p of arable pasture, meadow, and woodland, called Aysdale Gate and Tidkinhow, situate in the parish of Skelton, in Cleveland, in the county of York, late the estate of John Harker deceased. Printed particulars may be had at the said masters chambers, in Northampton buildings; of Messrs Perkins and Frampton, Greys Inn square; Messrs Bell, Broderick, and Bell, Bow church yards, London; Of John Page Sowerby, solicitor, Stokesley, at whose office a plan may be seen; Messrs Garbett, Blackett and Fawcett, solicitors, Stokesley and Yarn; And Messrs Thomas Simpson and sons, land agents, Nunthorpe, at whose office is also a plan may be seen; and at the place of sale.

This had clearly followed a court case regarding a disputed will. There aree papers relating to the case Harker v Brigham in which the plaintiffs were: Thomas Harker, Mary Harker, Rebecca Salome Harker, Benjamin Willis Harker and Ellen Elizabeth Harker, infants by said Thomas Harker their father and guardian and the defendants: George Brigham and Robert Brigham. The dispute related to the estates of William Powell, testator in Didderhow [Didderhowe], Stokesley, Yorkshire, Middleton St George, Durham and estate of John Harker, testator in Tidkinhow [Tidkinhow Farm], Aysdale Gate, Yorkshire. There is a list of tenants and rents, receipts and disbursements. The Receiver was Thomas Simpson. The Chancery Master was William Brougham. The full record of the case are held by the National Archives, Document Reference C 101/3540.

1843

John Farndale (FAR00217) gave an account of wild celebrations at Brotton after the battle of Waterloo in 1815. Robert Stevenson, a local merchant built Stephenson’s Hall in Brotton and provided barrels of ale and a band of musicians (headed by John Farndale), who then sang and danced till dawn. When Robert Stevenson died in 1825, everything went to his daughter, Mary, who had previously married Thomas Hutchinson, a master mariner from Guisborough. Mary and Thomas settled in Stephenson’s Hall which soon became Brotton Hall and over the years they bought various properties in Brotton. Thomas was a close friend of John Walker Ord, the historian and poet of Cleveland, and in 1843, Thomas invited Ord to join him on a picnic to Tidkinhow which was then part of Hutchinson’s dispersed property. Ord composed a poem in honour of that day, which is shown below, with thanks to Dr Tony Nicholson for passing a copy to me:

 

CLEVELAND SKETCHES

 

Tidkinghow (sic).

 

The following lines are written to commemorate a Fete Champetre furnished to his friends by Thomas Hutchinson Esq of Brotton Hall, and his amiable lady, on Monday, September 18th, 1843:

 

 

A Fete Champetre is an outdoor entertainment such as a garden party.

1857

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1862

There is a plan of two farms called Aysdale Gate and Tidkinhow in the parish of Skelton, with section showing the depth of ironstone, by Richard Cordner Stanhope, 20 Dec. 1862; and draft memorandum of agreement between John Bainbridge of Aysdale Gate Farm, Slapewath, farmer, and W.H.A. Wharton of Skelton Castle, Esq, Aug. 1893 held at Teeside Archives.

1863

The Yorkshire Herald and York Herald, 14 February 1863: Skelton, near Guisborough, in the Ironstone District of Cleveland. VALUABLE FREEHOLD ESTATE. To be sold at auction, that the House of Mr Henry Watson, the Buck Inn, in Guisborough, on Tuesday, the third day of March 1863, at 2 o’clock in the afternoon, Mr Henry Watson, auctioneer, all that valuable FREEHOLD ESTATE, consisting of two farm houses and requisite outbuildings, and 273 acres 3 Roods and 2 Perches of arable, meadow, pasture and woodland, called “Aysdale Gate” and “Tidkinhow”, situated in the parish of Skelton, in the county of York, and now in the occupation of Mr Elisha Pegg. The celebrated Cleveland Ironstone has been proved in this Estate, and there is a valuable quarry of freestone. The ironstone mines of J T Wharton and T Chaloner, Esquires, immediately adjoining the above a state, are now in full operation. The estate is 3 miles from the market town of Guisborough, and within 700 yards of the Cleveland Railway. All the above premises are subject to a tithe rent charge of twenty shillings, variable according to the Tithes Commutation Acts, and also the annual payment of 13s 6d for land tax. The tenants will be shown the premises, and further information, with printed particulars and lithographed plans may, after the 5th of February next, be obtained on application to...

A history of the Aysdalegate Mine Shaft records that William Barningham took out a lease on Aysdalegate Farm and Tidkinhow Farm in 1864. Progress was very slow with the 268ft shaft still being sunk in March 1868. Production started in 1877 and ended in 1880. William Barningham died in 1882.

Extracted from Anne Weatherill's diary: Guisborough 1863. The diary of Anne Weatherill of Guisborough was written when she was 22 years old, in a small notebook, measuring six inches by four inches and records her activities between January and September 1863.
It was written twenty years before the Farndales moved to Tidkinhow. She began the little diary soon after returning from a visit to London. Back at home in Guisborough, she records attending impromptu dances and invitation balls, she visited Redcar and stayed with friends in Stockton and Carlton-in-Cleveland. She took part in a choir festival and lent a hand in local festivities. A constant feature through the months is her descriptions of the changing seasons and the beauty of the countryside. Anne lived in Northgate in Guisborough with her family; her father Thomas, a prosperous brewer, landowner and businessman, her mother Margaret, her 20 year old sister Kate, and her brothers William and Herbert, aged 18 and 14.  On Friday August 14th she wrote about Mr Morgan's picnic. Mr Atkinson opened a tumulus in the moor near Tidkinhoe [Tidkinhow] and found two urns, the date at least one thousand five hundred years before Christ. Canon Atkinson of Danby was a natural scientist and archaeologist, much engaged on the Skelton and Guisborough moors that summer.
Go to the website which records Anne's diary

 

1876

The Northern Echo, 19 June 1876: SALES BY PUBLIC AUCTION. Tidkinhow Farm, near Guisborough - To timber merchants, mine owners etc. MESSRS HODGSON AND FARROW are favoured with instructions to sell by auction, on Thursday, June the 22nd, 1876, at the house of Mr G Storey, the Fox and Hounds Inn, Slapewath, at Two O’clock in the afternoon, the following timber in three lots, comprising 152 prime larch trees, 40 prime ash trees, 80 prime oak trees, new standing marked in the above named wood. The Wood Agent will attend at the Tidkinhow Farmhouse, to show the timber, on the 20th of June. If required, part of the whole timber can remain standing until next February. For further particulars apply to the auctioneers, Stokesley. 

1881

The Northern Echo, 22 February 1876: Tidkinhow Farm, near Guisborough - To timber merchants, mine owners etc. MESSRS HODGSON AND FARROW are favoured with instructions to sell by auction, on Thursday, March the 10th, 1881, at the house of Mr G Storey, the Fox and Hounds Inn, Slapewath, at Two O’clock in the afternoon, the following timber, comprising 400 larch trees, felled and laid in lots of 20 each, 316 oak trees, new standing marked in the above named wood. Terms cash. Mr Jacon Russell, of the Tidkinhow Farm will show the timber. If required, part of the whole timber can remain standing until December 24th, 1881. For further particulars apply to the auctioneers, Stokesley.

1882

The Northern Echo, 17 March 1882: FOR SALE, large quality quantity of seed potatoes, Magnum Bonums, Myatts and Scotch Roughs, Jacob Russell, Tidkinhow Farm, Guisborough.

1885

The Yorkshire Herald and York Herald, 28 November 1885: AYSDALEGATE AND TIDKINHOW FARMS, Slapewath, near Guisborough. The Trustees of the late Wm Barningham are prepared to receive tenants for the letting of the whole of these valuable Old Grass Land Farms, comprising together about 2300 acres, with all their buildings. A grand opportunity either for sheep farmers or dairy keepers. Immediate possession can be given. For particulars apply to JOHN WOODFIELD, Springfield, Darlington.

The Farndale Era

Martin Farndale (FAR00364) and his family moved into Tidkinhow in 1885. As tenant farmers.

It was at Tidkinhow that eight further children were born. In 1889 their seventh child, William, died aged two. He was buried at Skelton on 21 July 1889.

·         Catherine Jane born Tidkinhow 16 June 1884

·         James born Tidkinhow 22 December 1885

·         William born Tidkinhow 22 June 1887 (died 19 July 1889)

·         Mary Frances born Tidkinhow 22 January 1889

·         William born Tidkinhow 29 January 1892

·         Grace Alice born Tidkinhow 21 April 1893

·         Dorothy Anne born Tidkinhow 24 May 1895

·         Alfred born Tidkinhow 5 July 1897

 

Tidkinhow was a small farm, but it had large tracts of moorland for sheep grazing. It produced most of what the family needed while money was made from the sheep, their wool and lambs, together with a small milk round.

The house was small - a kitchen, a dining room, a sitting room and four bedrooms. The children all went to school at Charltons, a small hamlet about a mile away towards Guisborough.

As the eldest grew up, they went away to work on neighbouring farms or in the mines.

Later, seven of the twelve were to go to western Canada and USA to make their lives there.

Martin's two brothers lived nearby; John the next lived at Loftus and worked on the LNER and Matthew farmed at Craggs Hall near Brotton. There is a story that, while living at Tranmire, Martin asked Matthew to go and take Craggs Hall for him. On his return Matthew said that he had taken it, but for himself! Martin however always spoke highly of his brother who helped him to get to Tidkinhow, a farm on Wharton estate.

1891

The North Star (Darlington), 26 September 1891: IMPORTANT STOCK SALE IN CLEVELAND. The first of what is intended to be an annual sale of sheep at Kildale in Cleveland was held yesterday afternoon, and proved a great success. The farmers of this important sheep breeding district have hitherto sent their sheep to Goathland, near Whitby, but, owing to the great distance between the two places, it was decided at a meeting of farmers two months ago to start a sheep sale at Kildale. No fewer than 1,200 sheep were entered, the drafts being from the following farmers: -... Farndale, Tidkinhow ...

 

1900

 

The freehold of Tidkinhow was sold in 1900. The North Star, 13 October 1900: To be sold by auction by Messrs Robert Imeson and son at the Grand Hotel, Middlesbrough, on Tuesday, the 23rd day of October 1900 … All that Freehold Estate, consisting of two farm houses, with the requisite outbuildings and 273 ¾ acres, or thereabouts, of arable, meadow, pasture and woodland, called AYSDALEGATE and TIDKINHOW, situate in the parish of Skelton in Cleveland, in the county of York. The celebrated Cleveland Ironstone underlies the estate, and two well finished shafts have already been sunk to the main scene at a depth of 50 fathoms each, and of respective diameters of 13 1-3 and 10 feet, and competent authorities estimates that the seam will yield an output of about 4 ¾ millions tonnes of Ironstone. There is also a serviceable bed of clay for brick making, and a free stone quarry on the estate, also a spring from which a free and ample supply of excellent water can be obtained for the boilers and other purposes. The buildings consist of engine house, containing 18 inch cylinder winding engine, with drum complete, and an 8 inch cylinder winding engine; boiler house, blacksmith’s and joiner’s shops, containing machinery for Smith’s Earths etc; store rooms, cottage, offices etc. The mine has been opened out to the extent of about 192 yards by the said William Barningham to prove the ore, several hundred tonnes of which are now lying in adjoining heaps, which, however, do not belong to the Vendors. For a comparatively small additional expenditure operations for working the iron ore could be commenced at a very early period. The property is 3 miles from the town of Guisborough, within about 750 yards from the North East Railway Company’s mainline to Middlesbrough, with which it is connected by a railway track over adjoining land belonging to the trustees of Lady Hewley’s Charity, of which the vendors have agreed to take a lease for a term of 21 years from the 1st July, 1899, at a fixed wayleave rent of £100 per annum, a further rent of ½ d per ton for each ton carried over the said railway track beyond 48,000 tonnes,...

 

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Tidkinhow Farm in about 1900  

 

1903

 

Lynn was the first to marry. She was working at Tancred Grange and on 22 August 1903 she married the owner, George Barker. She was 24. She was to have six children and her descendents were still living at Tancred in 1982. Two days after, she was married, her mother wrote to her. This letter survives:

"Tidkinhow, Aug 24 1903

My Dear Daughter

I received your letter and was glad to hear you arrived all right. I hope you and your husband are enjoying yourselves and that you are having fine weather. It is raining here today. John will take your luggage and leave it at Darlington tomorrow as he is going back to Newcastle. I posted all the boxes on Saturday night that were addressed and I will send the others to you with the cake. I gave the postman 2/6 this morning and he was very pleased. We have to wish you much joy & happiness for him. You must write after you get home and let me know if you get the luggage all right. I now conclude with kind regards to you both.

I remain your affect mother

C J Farndale"

Meanwhile life at Tidkinhow continued. Weekly shopping expeditions by pony and trap to Guisborough to buy groceries were followed by elder members of the family going out on Saturdays in Guisborough. They went for lots of walks and met neighbours. There were horse drawn and later motor buses and from time to time a 'break' would take them on an outing to a sow somewhere. John was working down the mines, Lynn was married, Martin was a bit delicate as a boy and spent much time at home helping his father. George was working on a local farm. Kate was at home and James was a butcher. His younger brother, William, was an apprentice butcher at Saltburn and Mary soon went away to learn confectionary. Grace, Dorothy and Alfred were at home.

1905

 

Catherine Jane frequently wrote to her children when they were away. She often visited members of her family at Bishop Auckland. There are two postcards written to Grace, one from Bishop Auckland (25 Sep 1906) simply saying "Will be at Bishop Auckland Wednesday by train" and the other from Etherley Schools where Catherine Jane had been (6 Mar 1905), saying "This is where I went to school a long time since. I hope you are keeping well."

But life was not easy and it was becoming more difficult to make a living, let alone realise ambitions. Martin was the first to want to spread his wings. Many young men in the district were going abroad and there was great pressure to colonise the western provinces of Canada. He was, however, concerned at the effect on his mother on leaving and this concern is clearly reflected in two letters written from SS Tunisian after he had left without saying goodbye. Clearly this was done to avoid the worry and concern of his departure. He left Liverpool on Thursday 16 June 1905.

June 16th 1905, Friday morning

Dear Sister

Just a few more lines. I left Liverpool on Thursday night for Canada on SS Tunisian. I have had a good night's sleep. I have booked second class on board and is very comfortable. We are passing by the north of Ireland this [ ]. The ship makes a call here to take on more passengers. This letter will be sent on from here. I shall not be able to post any more letters till I land at yond side. I am enjoying the trip well so far. I hope mother will not fret is she get to know before I write. I will send a letter to her as soon as we land. I am going to do best . I am going a long way up the country. I am to Calgary in Alberta. It is chiefly cattle farming there. There is several more young men on ship that are going out from there can catch. But I have not meet any lady that is my way yet. You must try and cheer mother up. There is nothing for her to trouble about. I am as safe here as riding on the railways in England. I shall be about other 7 days on the water. I will send a few letters off before I start my land journey. I have not time write more. I want to up on deck. We are just about to land at Londonderry I believe.

I must leave hoping you are all well.

M Farndale
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And five days later:

Letter cannot be posted for England till we land so you will know if you get this that I landed all right.

Wednesday June 21st 1905

Dear Sister

I shall soon get my sea trip over now. Land was sighted today Newfoundland I believe. Every body is beginning to lighten up now. But it will be Saturday morning before we land at Montreal.

I have enjoyed voyage up to now. I had one day sea sick. It was awful. I don't want that any more. We have had few very cold days. It is always cold n this part of the Ocean. We saw a great iceberg this morning. It was a great sight. This is a great rock of ice. So you must know we were passing through a cold front. This is a big vessel about two hundred yards long I should think. Every body seem quite happy. There is a smoke room and a music room. And the best of everything to eat. Third class seems to be rough quarters. But they are in another part of the ship. There will be about eight hundred passengers on board all together. Some men pulling long faces when the vessel left Liverpool. I never thought anything about it. But I was like the rest. I watched England till it disappeared out of sight. I hope mother will not trouble about me. I will be all right. I thought it was my best thing to do. I had nothing to start in business with in England. I shall be able to get about £50 per year and board with the farmers out here. If I can stand the climate. And I can settle. I shall be able to start farming for my self in about two years.

Thursday

All letters are to be posted tonight on board so that they will get away as soon as we land. They don't [ ] to a few hours when they land. So all has to be ready.

First and Second class are having a Grand On Board tonight. We shall be quite lively.

I now finish. Hoping you are all well. And remain your affectionate Bro.

M Farndale
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Martin was 24 years old. These letters start a whole branch of the Farndale family who emigrated to Alberta.

George followed his elder brother to Canada fairly soon afterwards and already Kate wanted to go to look after them, but they all knew that their mother was ailing. Jim also wanted to go, but did not want to leave

1910

 

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The boys of Tidkinhow in about 1910 – John Farndale, James Farndale, Alfred Farndale, William Farndale, George Farndale, Martin Farndale (inset)

 

 

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The girl Farndales of Tidkinhow with Barker children - Willie Barker, Dorothy Farndale, Mary Farndale, Mary Barker, Kate Farndale, Grace Farndale, Margaret Barker, John Barker - about 1910.

 

1911

 

The Whitby Gazette, 13 January 1911: PLOUGHING AND HEDGECUTTING COMPETITIONS. The Leadholm and Danby ploughing and hedge cutting competitions, which were established a year or two ago, and are the only competitions of the kind which are held in the immediate district, took place on Wednesday afternoon, at Egton. There was a large attendance and considerable interest was manifested by agriculturalists and others in the various events. Dyking was dropped out of the programme this year. The district includes the parishes of Danby, Glaisdale, Egton, Ugthorpe, Westerdale and Commondale, and competitors and spectators attended from most of the villages comprised in the area, and also from other places... The ploughing competitions were held on the land of Messrs M Farndale, W Jackson, Tynedale, and W Pearson and, and the hedge cutting on Mr Thomas Hutchinson 's land. The weather was favourable, and rain held off till the evening, when a heavy downpour took place. A luncheon was afterwards held at the Horse Shoe Inn.

 

The 1911 Census for Tidkinhow Farm, Boosbeck, Stanghow listed Martin Farndale, 65, farmer, head, born Charlton; John Farndale, 33; Catherine Jane Farndale, 26; William Farndale, 20, butcher; Grace Alice Farndale, 17; and Alfred Farndale, 13.

 

Gradually Catherine Jane weakened until on 14 July 1911 she died at Tidkinhow. Her death certificate shows that her husband, Martin, was with her and that she actually died of fibroid pathesis, cardiac failure, but she almost certainly had TB. Alfred later remembered his distress at her funeral in Boosbeck and being comforted by his nearest brother William on the way back. There is no doubt that her untimely death at the age of 56 was a great blow to the family. She is remembered by them all with the greatest affection. Her life had been hard but she had clearly cared for them all. She is remembered also as kind, intelligent, firm and determined. There was now a great gap at Tidkinhow and the family had to do their best to fill her place.

Soon after their mother's death William and Kate followed their two elder brothers to Canada. James had already sailed on 31 March 1911. There is a diary of his voyage which has been transcribed. Their stories are told elsewhere. Kate and George were never to return to England, but Martin did twice and William as a soldier. Jim returned as a soldier and visited again in the 1950s.

John Farndale would have increasingly taken over farming from his father at about this time, although Martin continued to farm until he died in 1928.

 

1915

 

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Willie Barker at Tidkinhow about 1915  

By the end of the war, the family were well scattered. John was still working locally; Lynn was still at Tancred Grange near Scorton; Martin was still a bachelor in Canada, as was George, both in Alberta. Kate had married William Kinsey and was living near her brother in Alberta. James had married Edna Adams and was living in San Antonio, Texas; William was dead and Mary was working in Leeds. Grace, Dorothy and Alfred were at home, but Alfred spent much time at Scorton with his eldest sister Lynn since her husband had died in 1919. Martin, in 1920, was 75 and still living at Tidkinhow.

1920   

By 1920 Tidkinhow was part of the much larger estate of the Wharton Family of Skelton Castle and again the freehold was sold. The North Star, 23 September 1920: PRELIMINARY NOTICE. BY DIRECTION OF LT COL; WHARTON, SKELTON CASTLE. PART OF THE SKELTON ESTATE, about 1,359 acres, will be Offered for Sale by Auction at an early date, subject to conditions being produced. T S Petch, Auctioneer. The Short Particulars are … MOORSHOLM DISTRICT … Tidkinhow and Stanghow Moor Farms, extending to about 553 acres

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Martin harvesting at Tidkinhow about 1920                                                          Martin Farndale mounted at Tidkinhow in about 1920                                                Margaret and Willie Barker, 1920  

1924

Grace went away to a job as matron at Monmouth High School for girls and there met Miss 'Peggy' Baker. Together they left the school in 1924 and went poultry farming first at Scorton and then at Leeming Bar. Peggy was later to marry Alfred and had many trips to Tidkinhow and met Martin. There is a letter from Martin to his daughter Grace, mentioning Peggy, undated, but must have been about 1927 just before he died:

"Dear Grace

I am doing well. Not much time to write. Father wishes you a very happy new year & Peggy write her. Quite well myself. Wanting to get up and abscond from here. ... from your ? father
"

1925                            

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Martin Farndale at Tidkinhow about 1925, note the sundial between the windows

1928

 

Martin Farndale died on 17 January 1928 and is buried at Boosbeck Church. His son John Farndale (FAR00553) continued farming as tenant on Tidkinhow Farm.

Grace Farndale’s diary touches on Tidkinhow, before her emigration to Alberta.

1937

 

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John and Elsie Farndale at Tidkinhow in about 1937

 

1939

 

The 1939 Register for Stranghow, Skelton and Brotton listed John Farndale, farmer, married, born 24 December 1877; and Elsie M Farndale, unpaid domestic duties, born 16 December 1893.

 

1940s

 

A biography of a musician, Graeme Miles (born 1935) tells that As a boy, he found recreation on the Tees marshes and in the wild, lovely moorlands of the Cleveland hills – another fertile ground for his works.  As a young man he and friends would spend weekends camping at the ruined Tidkinhow Farm, off the main Guisborough to Whitby moor road near Charltons.  No late-night bus to Guisborough from Middlesbrough in those days (hence the song Along The Guisborough Road).  They would get off at Nunthorpe and walk the several miles to Guisborough and then another three to Charltons and along to Tidkinhow.

 

1954

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Tidkinhow in 1954

1960s

The End of the Farndale Era

John Farndale farmed at Tidkinhow until he retired in the 1960s.

1987

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Tidkinhow in 1987 during the visit of George and Margery Kinsey of Alberta Canada

2016

There was a reunion of the descendants of Alfred Farndale in 2016 at Tidkinhow.

 

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Martin Farndale’s descendants

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Martin Farndale’s grand children, Margot Atkinson, Anne Shepherd and Geoff Farndale.

 

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A stone house with a lawn

Description automatically generated A house in a field

Description automatically generated A field with a house in the distance

Description automatically generated

 

A sign on a post

Description automatically generated A field of grass with cows and trees

Description automatically generated with medium confidence A field of grass with cows grazing

Description automatically generated with medium confidence

 

A field with bushes and a fence

Description automatically generated A dirt road in a field

Description automatically generated A wet road with a fence and a house in the background

Description automatically generated

 

A ping pong table in a room

Description automatically generated A room with tables and chairs

Description automatically generated A window in a stone wall

Description automatically generated

 

A room with a light shining through the ceiling

Description automatically generated A beam in a roof

Description automatically generated with medium confidence A log on a roof

Description automatically generated

 

A stone house with a red roof

Description automatically generated A stone building with a barn in the background

Description automatically generated A small brick building in a grassy field

Description automatically generated A house on a hill

Description automatically generated

 

A house in a field

Description automatically generated with medium confidence A brick well in a grassy field

Description automatically generated A low angle view of a building

Description automatically generated

 

A building in a field

Description automatically generated with medium confidence A stone house with a stone wall

Description automatically generatedA person and person working on a computer

Description automatically generated

 

 

A living room with a fireplace and a chair

Description automatically generated  A living room with a fireplace and a couch

Description automatically generated A room with a fireplace and pictures

Description automatically generated

 

A living room with a couch and a table

Description automatically generated A staircase leading to a door

Description automatically generated A view from the doorway of a bedroom

Description automatically generated

 

A bed with a bed frame and a window

Description automatically generated A pair of cups on a window sill

Description automatically generated A room with two beds

Description automatically generated

 

A bedroom with a window

Description automatically generated A bed with a lamp on the side

Description automatically generated A door in a room

Description automatically generated A red curtain on a window sill

Description automatically generated

 

A grey fabric with drawings on it

Description automatically generated  A house in a field

Description automatically generated A house with a fence

Description automatically generated

 

2024

 

Tidkinhow Farm is a holiday cottage today.